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dc.creatorVasilić, Željko
dc.creatorStanić, Filip
dc.creatorRanđelović, Anja
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-05T09:21:54Z
dc.date.available2024-04-05T09:21:54Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.iees.tuc.gr/
dc.identifier.urihttps://grafar.grf.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/3495
dc.description.abstractIntroduction. When designing the road drainage system special attention is given to environmental protection, which requires the removal of potentially hazardous elements via separators to the required degree, usually defined by the local stakeholders and legislation. Afterwards, water is simply transferred to a nearby convenient recipient. Modern engineering practice however dictates the design of sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) for the collected water, which need to provide attenuation of the runoff and must be designed to mimic the natural catchment conditions with as little disruption of natural processes as possible [1]. SuDS are designed to maximize opportunities and benefits that can be secured from surface water management: water quantity, water quality, amenity and biodiversity [2]. Construction of roadside infiltration basins is one of the measures used for these purposes. Infiltration basins are relatively simple engineering objects designed and constructed as excavations with a corresponding filter layer at the bottom (gravel or crushed stone) [3]. Essentially, they are retention spaces for permanent water retention that receive collected stormwater runoff and drain it slowly into the surrounding soil. Retention space of infiltration basin provides a reduction in the maximum peak runoff value [4], while runoff quality is also improved by filtration through the filter layer and soil. There are number of similar type objects that can be used for this purpose, applicable to different sizes and types of surface purpose (residential, parking lots, etc.) [2]. The main advantages of infiltration basins’ application are 1) the relatively inexpensive cost of construction, 2) low space usage and 3) possibility of application in areas where there is no conventional stormwater sewer network or river that could serve as a recipient of stormwater runoff. This makes them particularly suitable for construction next to the roads of significant importance such as highways [5]. The retention of runoff contaminants using infiltration basins have been proven through the testing of such facilities after many years of use [6]. On the other hand, inefficiency in the operation of infiltration basins can be caused by the construction on land of poor water permeability and high groundwater levels. The stability of the surrounding structures can also be compromised given that infiltration increases the moisture of the surrounding soil [7]. Over time, there may be a decrease in the efficiency of infiltration due to clogging of the filter layer, caused by sedimentation of suspended particles. A common mistake being made in the design procedure is wrongful selection of the design storm for sizing the infiltration basin, i.e. the same design storm is used both for the collection system and the infiltration basin. Short duration, high intensity design storms are used for the design of the collection system as they result in maximum runoff peak values. Long duration, low intensity design storms should be used for the design of the infiltration basin itself as they result in much greater runoff volume which is essential for sizing of the infiltration basin. To ensure the efficiency and sustainable functioning of the infiltration basin, design procedure should carefully address the following: 1) selection of the proper design storm and 2) all aspects relevant for soil infiltration. Basic guidelines and recommendations for the design of similar type objects can be found in literature but are lacking in detailed description of the design procedure and infiltration calculation ([2], [8]). This paper presents a comprehensive methodology for the design and operational analysis of infiltration basins for road runoff that is incorporated into STORMEE – STORMwater Environmental Efficiency toolkit. Presented methodology encompasses all relevant hydrological and hydraulic analyses in detail, which overcomes the shortcomings present in currently available regulations and design guidelines, and is packed into a user-friendly interface. Showcased here is the analysis of a field scale infiltration basin 346 International Conference of the International Ecological Engineering Society, Chania, Greece, October 1 – 5, 2023 intended for runoff control from the section of the railway in Serbia. STORMEE allowssr
dc.language.isoensr
dc.publisherInternational Ecological Engineering Societysr
dc.rightsopenAccesssr
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.source12th International Conference of the International Ecological Engineering Society: Closed Cycles and the Circular Society 2023 The Power of Ecological Engineering, Chania - Greece, October 1-5, 2023sr
dc.subjectinfiltration basinsr
dc.subjectdesign stormsr
dc.subjectstormwater retentionsr
dc.subjecturban hydrological cyclesr
dc.titleScience behind STORMEE - STORMwater Environmental Efficiency toolkit: 1) infiltration basinsr
dc.typeconferenceObjectsr
dc.rights.licenseBY-NC-NDsr
dc.citation.epage348
dc.citation.spage345
dc.identifier.fulltexthttp://grafar.grf.bg.ac.rs/bitstream/id/12995/bitstream_12995.pdf
dc.identifier.rcubhttps://hdl.handle.net/21.15107/rcub_grafar_3495
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionsr


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